Program Details

June 6, 2012

June 7, 2012

Wednesday, June 6, 2012

8:30 am — 8:45 am

Welcome/Open Remarks

Dr. Mark R. Ginsberg, Dean, College of Education and Human Development, George Mason University

Keynote Speaker

8:45 am — 9:50 am

Learning in the Era of the So-Lo-Mo Enterprise
Dr. Tony O'Driscoll, Professor, Duke University's Fuqua School of Business

Not yet 20 years old, the browser-based web has permeated what we do socially, professionally and educationally to such an extent that we have become oblivious to the profound changes it has brought to how we connect, communicate, coordinate, collaborate and take collective action.

Today, the web is weaving wireless connections via mobile devices allowing us to simultaneously reach more people around the globe with increasingly localized and personalized content. Welcome to the So-Lo-Mo era. Join Dr. O'Driscoll as he unpacks the impacts that the convergence of Social, Local and Mobile technologies will play in redefining the role of learning in the modern-day digital enterprise.

Session 1

10:00 am — 10:50 am

Balancing Training Evaluation Impact with Business Outcomes: Why Hard ROI Numbers Distract Your Boss from the Real Value You Add to the Organization
Kenneth Reynolds, Senior Economist & Principal, SRA International
Alena Nikitsina, Senior Analyst, SRA International

Today's training evaluations have evolved towards a ROI focus that calculates "hard" dollar returns to justify an organization's training budget. What is getting lost are "soft" returns focusing on non-financial metrics such as customer and employee satisfaction, which allows an evaluation to more comprehensively align training outcomes (hard plus soft) to the organization's strategic goals. We will start by detailing a programmatic approach to training evaluations that balances a training evaluation outcomes approach. Our emphasis will be on developing, collecting, and reporting training evaluation business outcomes and performance measures that align strategically to the organization's mission.

10:00 am — 10:50 am

Building Online Learning Communities with Multiuser Blogging Environments
Prof. Michael Wilder, Instructional Design Coordinator, Office of Online Education at UNLV

Successful online learning environments encourage interaction between all participants. Unfortunately, traditional learning management system communication tools (such as text-based discussion forums and chat rooms) are often difficult to use and isolating.This session offers a potential solution using the multiuser blogging capabilities of WordPress and the social media features of the BuddyPress plugin to develop a fully integrated online learning community. This innovative combination of technologies provides secure communication and collaboration through such techniques as blog authoring, peer evaluation, social media, podcasting, and student-developed multimedia.

10:00 am — 10:50 am

Fill the Gap - Mobile First
Rebecca Clark, Program Manager - Learning Technologies Integration, Defense Acquisition University

Research in online learning led Defense Acquisition University leadership to encourage mobile learning as a primary factor in instructional delivery. In creating the DAU mobile assets that are now accessible via our mobile portal, we came to understand how requirements that call for a mobile solution can fill learning and performance gaps by delivering information, maps, skill development games, and on the job support

10:00 am — 10:50 am

Getting Lost in a 3D Virtual World: Selecting and Evaluating Appropriate Virtual Worlds for Learning
Dr. Karl Kapp

This presentation details the trials and tribulations of selecting, implementing evaluating and teaching within a 3D virtual World. The presentation is based on the experience of DAU as the organization journeyed down the road of 3D virtual world implementation. From cataloging hundreds of virtual worlds to working with a vendor to create a browser-based virtual world solution to preparing learners to enter a virtual world, you'll gain an understanding of the entire process from start to finish. Join your tour guides who will describe the process undertaken to choose a vendor, work out technical details, prepare instructors and conduct a pilot program learning within a 3D virtual environment. This engaging, exciting session highlights lessons learned from a real live implementation. You will be provided with tips and techniques for selecting your own 3D virtual world for learning, advice on conducting a pilot and a few pointers about what to avoid during the process.

10:00 am — 10:50 am

The Special Sauce of Social Learning
Dr. Marc J. Rosenberg Marc Rosenberg and Associates

Years ago, when McDonalds introduced the Big Mac, it wanted to separate its new sandwich from the rest of the crowd. It was the sauce, they said, that made it unique. The special sauce made the Big Mac a success. In the new era of social media, we must fully understand what makes one social learning experience stand out and another peter out. That's our special sauce. With all the excitement over social learning, we can lose focus as to how difficult it can really be to do it well. Hype can only go so far. The good news is that nine key success factors are emerging, beyond just getting the technology up and running, that make social media work in a learning context. This presentation focuses less on social media technology and more on the learning and organizational strategies that make it work.

Session 2

11:00 am — 11:50 am

7+/-2 Things Learning Professionals Need to Know About Analytics
Ellen Wagner, Partner and Sr. Analyst, Sage Road Solutions, LLC

(Note: the title refers to a classic 1956 article by George Miller called "The Magical Number Seven, Plus or Minus 2: Some Limits on our Capacity for Processing Information". http://www.musanim.com/miller1956/)

This session is an executive briefing on the emerging field of analytics that matter for learning professionals. It offers a summary of key facts about the power, promise and perils of analytics for learning, education and training. Participants will get a high level view of web, content and learning analytics, will consider technology and talent requirements for successful program implementation and will examine examples of descriptive, inferential and predictive techniques used for exploratory analysis.

We will take a look at what is meant by "big data" and consider how analytics are being used to promote personalization, convenience and consistency in all facets of our online lives. We define terms and demystify the language of statistics and quantitative measures in workplace settings. We show how intelligence gleaned by applying statistics analyses to the data routinely collected in learning settings, enabling better informed, more accountable decision-making. After considering use cases where analytics have transformed the ways in which people do their work, participants will identify opportunities where analytics techniques can be used in learning settings to improve learner engagement and motivation.

  • Session participants will learn the basic vocabulary needed to talk knowledgably about learning analytics in workplace settings, and will have a heightened understand of how analytics can effectively inform enterprise decision-making
  • Session participants will be able to articulate how analytics are used in everyday consumer life to personalize online experiences, including learning experiences
  • Session participants will identify workplace opportunities where collecting data and analyzing results may be able to help personalize learning experiences and make it more relevant for improving workplace performance.

11:00 am — 11:50 am

Applying Learning Science at Scale
Bror Saxberg, M.D., Ph.D.,Chief Learning Officer

There are decades of careful, randomized controlled trial research on what helps, or hinders, learning, and quite a bit known from laboratory studies about the specific ways in which text, audio, and images can help (or hinder) learning. There are not that many examples of applying this kind of research at scale to learners, and looking to see whether good principles, applied at scale, can actually "move the needle" for learning. We'll discuss some of the research results that have been out there for a while, then describe a recent intervention built from these for a virtual higher education learning environment, and discuss the possibilities for more success going forward with careful measurement applied at scale.

11:00 am — 11:50 am

Avoiding "Ready, Fire, Aim" with a Mobile Learning Strategy
Christopher King, Principal Consultant, SRA International, Inc.

Is mobile learning really the future, or is it just another "the classroom is dead" hype cycle? Are you on track to add real value by rethinking learning activities from a mobile perspective? What does a mobile learning strategy include? Can you even define "mobile learning?" Attend this session to examine your organization's readiness for mobile learning; evaluate content suitable for "m-Learning;" consider a strategic framework for mobile; and discuss how to build a business case. This session is suitable for both those just getting started with mobile learning, and those looking for help explaining "why mobile learning?"

11:00 am — 11:50 am

Recommendations for Designing Learning Events in 3D Virtual Worlds
Dr. Lee Taylor-Nelms, Senior Consultant, Booz Allen Hamilton
Trey Reyher, Senior Consultant, Booz Allen Hamilton

Designing instructional events for virtual worlds requires new competencies for even the most experienced instructional systems designers. The environments, the courses, and the interactions are limited only by one's imagination. Practice your emergency response to a virtual bio-terrorism in a NY city subway with key players from around the world. Teach your medical students how to stop a heart attack from inside a virtual heart/classroom. Do old instructional design strategies even apply? In this highly interactive session, we will see if Robert Gagne's classic Nine Events of Instruction apply to 3D virtual worlds.

11:00 am — 11:50 am

Organizational Leadership Capability - Knowing What Leadership Investments You Need.
J. Keith Dunbar, Learning & Talent Development Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) Group Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC)

In an environment that is volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous...the VUCA environment...organizations must continue to create agile and adaptable workforce capabilities. This includes the most critical capability...leadership. This session will look at environmental factors affecting leadership development, importance versus effectiveness of developing future leaders and a Human Capital Development model for identifying the right leadership capabilities that inform investment decisions.

Please join us as senior learning & talent management executive, J. Keith Dunbar of SAIC shares with us:

  • The environmental factors affecting leadership development.
  • The Importance vs. Effectiveness Curve of developing future leaders.
  • Human Capital Development Model for identifying the right leadership capabilities.

Keynote Speaker

1:10 pm — 2:10 pm

Analytics: Sensemaking, Prediction, Performance
Dr. George Siemens, Author of Knowing Knowledge and Researcher, Athabasca University

Data is an asset. Managing and understanding it should be as critical an organizational concern as financial or supply chain management. Organizations and individuals now face more data than ever before, but are unfortunately trying to cope with antiquated methods and tools. As a consequence, enormous value is lost daily as data goes unanalyzed and important insights are lost "in the mass of the inconsequential". Inefficient use of data is particularly evident in the learning and development needs of employees. The costs, financial and in lost capacity for performance, of this missed opportunity are significant. This presentation will provide an overview of how successful organizations are using analytics to help employees make sense of complexity, how data trails and multiple data sources can help predict learner success, and finally, how organizational performance can be improved through learning analytics.

Session 3

2:20 pm — 3:10 pm

Examining Interaction and Immediacy Behaviors in Distance Education
Kathy Bohnstedt, Ph.D, Researcher/Technical Writer, George Mason University
Marci Kinas-Jerome, Ph.D, Assistant Professor and Program Coordinator, George Mason University

The study presented examines the experiences of professors teaching in a multi-point videoconferencing instructional environment and how they interacted with students in proximate and remote classrooms. Qualitative and quantitative data were analyzed to gain an understanding of the teaching experience and examine differences between instructor interaction and immediacy behaviors based on student location. Results indicate that no clear difference existed in instructor interaction behaviors with local and remote populations, but that they engaged in more immediacy behaviors with the remote population in their classes. Additionally, instructor interaction behaviors were more closely tied to student interaction behavior than to student location.

2:20 pm — 3:10 pm

The Federal Government and Social Media: Agencies are Doing WHAT??
Elizabeth D. Hochberg, LLM, Assistant General Counsel, General Services Administration

Agencies and departments across the government are successfully using social media platforms in powerful ways. From helping tornado victims, to protecting diplomatic personnel overseas, to helping citizens navigate airport checkpoints - social media is being well-utilized in government to deliver services to taxpayers in entirely new and innovative ways. Social media is not a fad and it's not going anywhere. It has changed the rules of the game not only for how industry works but for government, too. Learning to utilize these new technologies and understanding the legal limitations that agencies face when implementing them is crucial for all government personnel.

2:20 pm — 3:10 pm

Innovation, Learning and the Competitive Edge
Rovy Branon, Executive director, University of Wisconsin-Extension in Madison

New technology is expanding the bounds of human capability. Tools are exceeding the capacity our organizational, economic, and societal systems to keep pace. At a time when innovation is no longer optional, our aging educational institutions are struggling to adapt. Efforts at change can seem futile and yet transformation of our environment continues. We will take time to explore some of the myths and realities of innovation and how learning technologies hold the key to personal and organizational competiveness.

2:20 pm — 3:10 pm

Working Smarter in Networks
Dr. Harold Jarche

As complexity increases in the networked economy, we need to integrate learning into the workflow. Communities of practice bridge the gap between getting work done and serendipitously connecting to social networks. Learning and development in the networked workplace must move from content delivery to community enablement. Harold Jarche will present a new framework for working smarter in Enterprise 2.0 and the importance of narration of work, transparency and knowledge-sharing in increasing innovation.

2:20 pm — 3:10 pm

Innovative Use of a Community of Practice (CoP) in an On-line Course
Ivan Teper, Knowledge Manager, Defense Acquisition University

Background: CLR 151- Analysis of Alternatives, is an on-line continuous learning module that presents the process used by the DoD to conduct an Analysis of Alternatives (AoA) in support of requirements, system acquisition, and resourcing. The content in this course is built upon numerous DoD policies and procedures that are frequently changing.

Problem: How to quickly communicate changes in DoD policies and procedures to the students who are taking an on-line course without having to go through the course vendor's change order process.

Solution: A link to the Requirements Management Community of Practice (CoP) was added to the on-line course. When students click on the CoP link, they are taken to the CoP where they can obtain the most recent policies and procedures related to the course topic. Faculty are able to add and delete content in the CoP at any time.

Summary: Integrating social media platforms (Communities of Practice) with formal learning (on-line courses) saves time & money for the University and enables the students to quickly access current and relevant content.

Session 4

3:20 pm — 4:10 pm

Learning Analytics: The Holy Grail of Social Media
Karine Joly, Executive Director, Higher Ed Experts

The 2012 State of the Web and Social Media Analytics in Higher Ed While the use of "Learning Analytics" is currently gaining more traction in higher education, some marketers in universities and colleges across the country have been using web and social media analytics for a few years. Started 2 years ago, the "higher-ed web analytics revolution" can now be analyzed. In this session, you'll get a good quantitative and qualitative overview of how institutions have adopted analytics to inform their marketing decisions. By sharing the main results of the 3rd yearly survey on the State of Web and Social Media in Higher Ed, trends, emblematic success stories and useful resources. Karine Joly will also help you become a web and social media evangelist at your institution.

3:20 pm — 4:10 pm

Informal Learning in the Intelligence Community with IntelliMedia
Ben Bonnet, Instructional Developer, Booz Allen Hamilton
Kevin Knowles, Instructional Developer, Booz Allen Hamilton

The Intelligence Community (IC) in the United States has undergone a major transformation in the way that members share information. Blogs, microblogs and wikis now facilitate collaboration between agencies. There has been a clear need to build a learning experience that extends the tools of social and informal information sharing by bringing curated, rich-media to learners through informal channels. This presentation will focus on IntelliMedia, the first learning application in the IC to integrate multiple media formats with social media components. This fusion is building community around high quality learning content for all learners in the IC.

3:20 pm — 4:10 pm

Fostering an Innovative Culture in the Federal IT Marketplace
Mary Davie, Assistant Commissioner, Office of Integrated Technology Services (ITS)

Today's Federal IT acquisition marketplace is in a state of ongoing transformation. Administration priorities have shifted from large IT infrastructure investments to more modular, cost-conscious projects, thereby influencing the procurement strategies of contracting offices across government. To stay competitive in this changing landscape, federal organizations will need to implement strategies that foster a culture of innovation. Such strategies could involve:

  1. Taking smart risks - Experimenting with new technology and generate lessons learned so that knowledge can be transferred seamlessly across organizations.
  2. Creating collaborative environments - Collaborating with external stakeholders to drive the creation of innovative solutions.
  3. Leveraging social media - Encouraging newer and more effective modes of communication to promote dialogue while monitoring market trends.

3:20 pm — 4:10 pm

Enculturating Innovation: Changes in Design Process and Identity as Perceived by Instructional Designers After Graduate Study
Dr. Brenda Bannan, Associate Professor Instructional Technology, Graduate School of Education, George Mason University
Jesse Ortel, PhD in Education student, Learning Technology Design Research concentration, George Mason University
Michelle Dunham, PhD in Education student, Learning Technology Design Research concentration, George Mason University

Corporations now more than ever require an innovative and adaptable workforce to compete in our continually changing world and economy. Those involved in learning professions such as instructional design are challenged to grow and change with the field's ever-evolving demands. These skills are often learned on the job or honed through formal graduate study. This qualitative study examines self-perceived changes in design process and identity of several professional instructional designers. The study reveals interesting insights such as use of user-centered design processes and life-long learning perceptions that can inform employers in cultivating their designer's learning trajectories.

3:20 pm — 4:10 pm

Mobile Learning is so 10 Minutes Ago. Mobile Performance is NOW!
Prof. Rich Mesch, Senior Director, Strategy & Innovation

Mobile applications aren't just about brevity, they're about applicability. People "learn" from their mobile devices all the time, they just don't call it training. People tend to use mobile devices in short intense bursts, when they need information right away, in down-time, such as between appointments, to retrieve information that may not be at their fingertips, or to get information that may be so current or time-sensitive, there's no other way to get it other than right now.

Session participants will learn that the most success occurs when organizations turn from mobile learning to mobile performance support. You'll learn that we must redefine our definition of training success ... not going through "training" to check off a box, but acknowledging that completion may just be a peek at the right content or a connection to the right person at the point of need. You'll learn that you need to design differently, you need to do needs analysis differently, and you need to consider things that you have never considered before.

In this session, you will learn:

  • How to create a mobile strategy that supports performance rather than learning
  • Why adapting conventional learning paradigms to mobile devices is ineffective
  • The relevant research on how adults use mobile devices
  • How to use mobile technology effectively for performance support
  • Some reusable strategy and design models for creating effective mobile performance

Session 5

4:20 pm — 5:10 pm

Meta-Moderated Course Design & Management
Joe McCahill, Instructional Systems Design Consultant
Dr. Nada Dabbagh, Professor & Director, Division of Learning Technologies, George Mason University

Meta-moderation is the process by which users of a website rank-order content provided by a site moderator. These rankings can then be assessed to determine the relative value of the information provided by that moderator. In this way users and moderators work together to design a more effective online experience. This presentation explores how the concept of content meta-moderation might repurposed to support the increasingly democratic relationships emerging between teachers and learners. In particular we will examine how web-based content ranking systems such as meta-moderation may be applied to online course (and content) design and management.

4:20 pm — 5:10 pm

Data Changes Everything
Dr. Phil Ice, Ed.D, VP, Research & Development, American Public University System

Institutions of all types are operating under the most intense scrutiny of our lifetime. They are sitting on terabytes of currently unusable, siloed data that could unlock answers to some of their most pressing problems, as it relates to student retention, learning effectiveness and institutional productivity. In the corporate sector, elearning provides a dynamic means of disseminating training, however, measuring the success of implementations is dependent on relating initiatives to outcomes. In higher education, data is often siloed and not readily accessible to create timely business intelligence. This session will present participants with strategies for raising awareness of data readiness within the institution, obtaining buy-in and motivating stakeholders. The focus will be placed on harnessing data to implement cycles of continuous quality improvement for both learners and faculty.

4:20 pm — 5:10 pm

Facilitating Innovation: Leveraging Technology
Dr. Clark Quinn, Ph.D, Quinnovation

Going forward, continual innovation will be the only truly sustainable differentiator, so how do you take advantage? Innovation doesn't happen spontaneously, but instead must be cultivated, and certain factors contribute while others hinder. How do you then increase the likelihood of success? The answer is a confluence of culture, process, and infrastructure. In this talk we will explore how the myth of individual innovation has been busted, and talk about what leads to successful innovation. We will explore what makes it likely that innovation will happen, what can be done to foster innovation, and how technology can play a role in optimizing the process.

4:20 pm — 5:10 pm

Tablets in the Classroom
Prof. Darrell Van Hutten, Professor of Acquisition management, Defense Acquisition University

Recent advances and wide proliferation of eReader devices has brought increasing interest in making effective use of the devices in the classroom. This presentation will present some real world reality of implementing eReaders based on DAU's experience adapting printed course materials to eReader formats in support of the Nook, Kindle DX and iPad. Planning considerations and lessons learned will be shared. Two main takeaways are planned: Importance of understanding assumptions, and effectiveness is not about the eReader itself.

4:20 pm — 5:10 pm

Virtual World Interventions that Work
Karen Cooper, Ph.D, Research Scientist, Future Workforce Technologies and Strategies

Virtual Worlds have been shown to be a highly effective platform for instruction and learning. Although virtual worlds such as Second Life or Open Sim are experientially rich by design, it is the instructional design aligned with the learning goals, not the media delivery platform, that creates effective instruction and the greatest learning.

This session presents a collection of instructional interventions that have been shown to be extremely conducive to immersive virtual worlds settings, and therefore highly effective instructional designs. Virtual world examples will be presented, along with a discussion of the effectiveness of the design and platform, for each example. This workshop will demonstrate what makes certain instructional designs better than others, as well as highlighting the learning skills they promote.

Thursday, June 7, 2012

8:30 am — 8:45 am

Welcome/Opening Remarks

Mrs. Katrina McFarland, President of the Defense Acquisition University

Keynote Speaker

8:45 am — 9:50 am

Closing the Talent Gap with e-Learning
Mr. Mitchell Kapor, Founder of the Lotus Development Corporation

In the midst of a major new wave of information technology aimed at learning delivery via the Internet, let us consider how best to leverage it to maximum effect. All organizations in our society, and society as a whole, face major challenges in maintaining a sustainable advantage in an increasingly competitive global economy. We can only accomplish this by developing the entire national talent pool, leaving no future engineer or skilled worker behind. To do this, we must learn to use develop and apply e-Learning resources in ways that narrow, rather than widen gaps in educational access and achievement across race and class. The opportunity is at hand if are able to seize it in a truly innovative way.

Session 1

10:00 am — 10:50 am

A Social Media Marketer Guide to Online Course Design
Karine Joly, Executive Director, Higher Ed Experts

Marketing online is different from teaching online. Or is it? In this presentation showcasing a case study of 3 online courses targeted to people working in universities and colleges, you'll learn how social media and web marketing principles can be used in the design of online courses.While you might not think like a marketer by the end of this session, you'll be able to see with brand new eyes how to approach the design,implementation, measurement and maintenance of your online course.

10:00 am — 10:50 am

Continuing the Learning with Social Media: Turning training from a one-time event to an ongoing experience!
Laura Mattis, Sr. Training/Instructional Design Consultant, SRA International, Inc.
Christohper King, Principal Consultant, SRA International, Inc.

Training shouldn't be something you go to, or something you dread. It should be something you experience ongoing, over time and enjoy. Social media is a great way to turn your training "event" into an ongoing learning "experience". With more than 800 million Facebook users, 100 million Twitter users, and 135 million LinkedIn users, your audience is potentially already leveraging social media. Why aren't you when it comes to developing your employees or customers? This session explores the valuable role social media can play in learning and identifies best practices for incorporating social media in your training programs.

10:00 am — 10:50 am

The Future of the Training Department
Dr. Harold Jarche

Courses are artifacts of a time when information was scarce and connections were few. That time is almost over. The increasing complexity of our work is a result of our global interconnectedness. Today, routine work is being automated while standardized work is outsourced.

Only creative work gives organizations unique business advantages. However, creative work is difficult to replicate, constantly changes, and requires greater tacit knowledge. We know that tacit knowledge is best exchanged through conversations and social relationships. Learning amongst ourselves is becoming essential for work, as social learning networks enable better and faster knowledge feedback loops.

Harold Jarche will examine the future of the training department in an informal, social, and mobile environment.

10:00 am — 10:50 am

Staying connected to course graduates; an experiment in using Social Media
Prof. S. "Dusty" Schilling, Defense Systems Management College
Ivan Teper, PM for Knowledge Management, Defense Systems Management College

This presentation will describe our approach to continuing the relationship with Executive students after they complete our resident Executive Program Management Course. We will describe our ongoing experiment using the Program Management Community of Practice (PM CoP) as a method for "Electronic Reach Back" to the Executive students. Our objective is to meet the Executive's needs in the field, at their moment of need. We will discuss how we are addressing some of our challenges, including:

  • Understanding our customers and what they really want
  • Identifying appropriate content in terms of usability and usefulness
  • Applying the Five Moments of Need criteria
  • Dealing with the evolution of our customers, our faculty, and their use of Social Media; and our unique DoD security issues.

10:00 am — 10:50 am

The 2012 Gaming State of Affairs
Dr. Alicia Sanchez, Defense Acquisition University

This session will review the state of the industry for Serious Games. Recent research findings pertaining to the technology, pedagogy and effectiveness of serious games will be presented for discussion. This session will also review new and emerging trends in serious games such as gamification and the use of badges and the common misconceptions that surround these topics. This session will additionally discuss concepts related to implementation of games in various contexts and settings ranging from education to training.

Session 2

11:00 am — 11:50 am

The Performance Ecosystem: Merging Formal and Informal Learning
Dr. Clark Quinn, Quinnovations

eLearning is much more than courses on the web with a quiz, or a classroom session delivered through the web. In reality, elearning is a vibrant ecosystem of technologies aligned towards empowering individuals to meet their full suite of learning needs from formal to informal, from active to reflective, across delivery environments. In this talk, we will a strategic look at performance, and explore the full spectrum of needs. We will then characterize the different opportunities, unpacking the different ways needs can be met including performance support, eCommunity, mobile, and more. We'll talk about creating an elegantly integrated ecosystem of support designed to help individual keep focused on task, with tools 'to hand'. Stop doing elearning tactically, and come get a more integrated picture.

11:00 am — 11:50 am

Communities of Practice Put Into Practice
Leslie Wallington, Associate, Booz Allen Hamilton
Marybeth Galvin, Associate, Booz Allen Hamilton

Booz Allen Hamilton has over 25,000 employees located across the United States and has met the challenge to capture, store, and leverage intellectual capital through Communities of Practice (CoP). With over 50 CoPs we have been able to tackle the challenge of managing the information overload associated with the ease of information access. Each CoP is comprised of a group of individuals who share a common interest or expertise in an area of study, a client, or business methodology. The CoPs are member driven and their offerings are tailored to meet the needs of the community members.

11:00 am — 11:50 am

Harnessing Your Creative Self
JR DeLaney, Instructional Designer, SRA International

An essential aspect of creativity is not being afraid to fail." Edwin Land said it best and is something all instructional designers should live by; striving to unleash that inner creative self should be at the forefront of every designer. Drawing, telling stories, and dancing allowed us to release this "beast" when we were children, but growing up has imprisoned it into the catacombs of what is "socially acceptable". This session will provide a pathway to opening up the prison doors where your creative self lies in wait through interactive exercises, enlightening examples, and the occasional self-deprecating joke.

11:00 am — 11:50 am

Twitter Goes to School
Mark Oehlert, Learning Technologies Team Manager

Twitter has millions of users who send billions of Tweets. It generates huge amounts of data and has become the world's best earthquake detector. How though can we use it in the realms of learning and training? Join us in this session and learn to select the best Twitter client for your intended use, how to start building your own Personal Learning Network and how to start thinking about integrating Twitter into your classes or learning experiences. Mark Oehlert is an Innovation Evangelist and has worked with the federal government, Fortune 500 firms and speaks and writes extensively about using social media for learning.

11:00 am — 11:50 am

Making Ideas Reality: The TALL Experience
Dr. Judith Hall Bayliss, Director, Teaching and Learning Lab (TALL), Defense Acquisition University
Janine Leboeuf, Program Manager, Teaching and Learning Lab (TALL), Defense Acquisition University

What happens when you build it? Will they come? The DAU Teaching and Learning Lab was created to provide strategic support through research, faculty training, and turning ideas into reality. This session provides an overview of the Lab's services and the research management process that guides critical business decisions about instructional technology implementations. Discussion topics include: How do you turn curiosity into a business case? What are the challenges, and possible solutions, encountered in starting up a Lab for professional educators? The session will cover the fundamentals: funding, footprint, strategic alignment, and staying in touch with the future.

Keynote Speaker

1:10 pm — 2:10 pm

Making the Most of Informal Learning
Ms. Jane Hart, Founder of the Centre for Learning & Performance Technologies (C4LPT)

Although many studies show that most of the learning that takes place in an organization is informal, it is clear that the term "Informal learning" is not well understood and its potential has not yet been exploited. However, the emergence of social media tools at last allow us to appreciate its potency, and at the same identify ways to support it in the workplace. But this also means that we need to think very differently about the types of services that we offer in order to address the broader learning and performance needs of the organization. In other words, it's no longer just about training!

Session 3

2:20 pm — 3:10 pm

Effective Analytics Practices, Dr. Shelly Metzenbaum - "Invited"
Dr.Shelley Metzenbaum, Associate Director for Performance and Personnel Management at the White House Office of Management and Budget

Dr. Metzenbaum will discuss the importance of analytics to the Administration's approach to performance management. Historically, the Federal Government excelled at gathering very large quantities of data but not at analyzing it. Dr. Metzenbaum will explain how this is changing across the government and needs to change more.

2:20 pm — 3:10 pm

Knowledge Sharing and Social Media Using Immersive Learning
Sabrina Christian, Instructional Systems Specialist, Defense Acquisition University
Jill Garcia, Knowledge Project Officer

Does your organization share knowledge? Does it use social media? Learn how a federal government organization is fostering a collaborative environment using knowledge sharing and social media. We will share how the Defense Acquisition University (DAU) used an immersive learning approach to motivate its faculty to use social media and knowledge sharing for collaboration and training. Be prepared to share your organization's experiences with social media/knowledge sharing including challenges and successes.

2:20 pm — 3:10 pm

Collaboration Across Campus: The Harvard Experience
Mr. Stephen Laster, Chief Information and Technology Officer of Harvard Business School

Harvard Business School has developed a best of breed of ecosystem to provide students, faculty and staff with an integrated, highly collaborative teaching, learning and working environment. The School's set of robust tools were designed to closely align with the voice of the HBS community, helping to match the right tools with key areas of demand. The framework was built to encourage collaboration in naturalways, helping students, faculty and staff more effectively participate in knowledge creation, teaching and learning. HBS has also embraced an integrated, single sign on environment to enhance findablity and content management across all collaboration tools further improving the way people share information. And, as a leader in the bring your own device movement, HBS has designed its ecosystem to ensure the collaboration tools extend to the variety of devices used crossed campus, further extending collaboration outside the classroom and across globe. In this session you will learn more about Harvard Business School's approach to collaboration, including its use of agile, iterative developments to continually improve the way faculty, students and staff use collaboration technology to enhance the way they teach, learn and work.

2:20 pm — 3:10 pm

Innovative Distance Education: A New Twist on Service Delivery using Collaborative Techniques
Kara Zirkle, IT Accessibility Coordinator , George Mason University
Korey Singleton, ATI Manager, George Mason University

Living in the digital age allows Universities to promote distance education using innovative technology and resources to reach a wide, diverse population and to provide a learning environment that is available at all times. We will look at the delivery and how we can use collaborative techniques to help make the class more accessible. Therefore by using a Universal Design aspect to also touch on various learning styles simultaneously for the same class we can reach more students.

2:20 pm — 3:10 pm

Thinking Differently with Mobile
Dr. Nancy Proctor, co-chair of the Museums and the Web annual conference

We've all heard of the incredible rise in use of mobile devices, and predictions that anticipate the majority of Internet use will come from mobile devices as early as 2014. But are we really taking advantage of the near-ubiquity of mobile devices to think, learn and engage with our communities differently in the cultural sphere? Drawing on examples from the Smithsonian Institution, whose strategic vision is to use mobile to "recruit the world" for the increase and diffusion of knowledge, Nancy Proctor looks at the transformative potential of mobile as a social media platform and connective tissue in the "museum as distributed network."

Session 4

3:20 pm — 4:10 pm

Study Results: Failure-Triggered Training Trumps Traditional Training
Daniel Harris Bliton, Instructional Strategist, Booz Allen Hamilton
Charles Gluck, Instructional Design Consultant, Booz Allen Hamilton

We didn't expect our highly interactive eLearning (that generated great post-test scores) to be completely ineffective in changing behaviors in the work environment! Could the same eLearning be made effective if delivered as failure-triggered training? Come learn the outcomes of a blind study of nearly 500 employees over nine months which analyzed multiple training approaches. The study shows that the same eLearning was significantly more effective when delivered as spaced events that employed learning at the point of realization. This combination of unannounced exercises and failure-triggered training (a See-Feel-Change approach) significantly reduced improper responses to phishing attacks by 36%.

3:20 pm — 4:10 pm

The Truth About Social Learning
Dr. Jane Bozarth,eLearning Coordinator, State of NC: author, Social Media for Trainers

"Social learning" and "informal learning" are among the training industry's hottest phrases these days. But there's so much confusion over what they mean, and what they mean to those of us in the business. A few truths:

  • Social learning isn't new.
  • Social learning isn't necessarily 'managed', 'launched', 'controlled', or 'measured'.
  • People in the workplace are learning all the time - without us.
  • Those people likely don't think of what they're doing as "learning".

In this session we'll spend some time looking at real examples of social and informal learning as it happens in workplaces all the time, every day. Along the way we'll generate some ideas for locating, supporting, facilitating --and assessing -- social learning opportunities toward the greater goal of enhancing organizational performance.

3:20 pm — 4:10 pm

eLearning or e-Waste of My Time; Getting More Using Serious Games
John Low, Chief Creative Officer, Carney, Inc.

Much of the eLearning being developed for federal agencies falls seriously short of impacting knowledge, skills, or behaviors on the job. It doesn't have to be this way. Serious games are being recognized as an effective way to motivate learners, encourage practice, and promote skill development and behavior change that extends to the job. Best practices are emerging for defining, scoping, and designing serious games to support a variety of performance and business objectives. We will present a soup to nuts approach for developing serious games that align game mechanics with performance objectives, audience needs, and project scope.

3:20 pm — 4:10 pm

Enabling enterprise-wide eLearning development at the USDA
John Rehberger, Deputy Director, U.S. Department of Agriculture
Joe Gorup, CEO, CourseAvenue

Presenters will share a case study of enterprise e-Learning development based on the U.S. Department of Agriculture's business process review and redesign. The USDA's innovative solution enables large-scale content development while maintaining centralized control over its learning and technology standards. The presenters will discuss: the results of the USDA's review of its e-Learning development process; actions taken to address process deficiencies; and results of the software pilot program that enabled the creation of more than 175 hours of self-paced, SCORM-conformant and Section 508 compliant e-Learning modules containing more than 15,000 pages and 5,000 media objects.

3:20 pm — 4:10 pm

Learning onDemand: How technology is shaping the future of learning
Reuben Tozman, Chief Learning Officer, edCetra Training Inc.

This session is based on the upcoming book published through ASTD Press. Web innovation outside of learning and development is feeding a content on demand model, the likes of which, we have never seen before. As a model for learning there has never been greater potential to fulfill the dream of personalized, just in time training. Yet learning and development organizations are still trying to focus on using technology to support an archaic model of education. What can we learn from innovation elsewhere? Find out in this thought provoking session.

Session 5

4:20 pm — 5:10 pm

From Funnel to Filter: Improved Business Results Courtesy of Learning and Development.
Tracy Bissette, President, WeejeeLearning
Ian Huckabee, CEO, WeejeeLearning

A corporate L&D department often acts as a funnel. Learning content is generated soley from the L&D function and bottlenecking occurs as different departments vie for L&D's resources, reducing productivity and compromising business results. An emerging model for L&D is that of filter where valuable information is collected and filtered from the very beginning of the project lifecycle. After this session, participants will be able to describe the ROI of a filter model for learning development, leverage existing resources with more impact, implement strategies for building community, and reach learners faster.

4:20 pm — 5:10 pm

Internet Memes: Instructional Foundations and Strategies
Faizan Mujeebuddin, Learning Architect, Accenture
Heather Stayrook, Curriculum Designer and Developer, Jack Welch Management Institute's Executive MBA Program

If you spend any amount of time on the Internet, you have seen, shared, or maybe even created an Internet meme. The global and rapid transmission of information on the social web means that within a matter of minutes, millions of people can laugh at a lolcat or say "aww" watching a video of a kitten. Internet memes provide great entertainment, but did you know they can also be great learning tools? Join the discussion on the role of social media as a cultural medium and how information and ideas are shared beyond a tweet or blog post. Participate by examining what make memes a powerful vehicle for transmitting knowledge and effective as instructional tools.

4:20 pm — 5:10 pm

Business Acumen for e-Learning Professionals: Tie Your Initiatives to the Bottom Line
Karen Gardner, Executive Director, ManTech International Corporation

Tying e-Learning initiatives to your company's bottom line financial performance is a business imperative in today's competitive environment. Learn how to make connections between business fundamentals and key business drivers and your e-Learning programs and initiatives. By aligning training with business strategies and metrics, you are tying your efforts to how a company makes money and measures business performance.

4:20 pm — 5:10 pm

S2 Operations Staff Simulation
Darlene Smith, Task Lead, C2 Technologies
Gayla Thompson, Sr. Project Manager, C2 Technologies

The S2 Operations Staff Simulation course places learners in a unit S2 staff, creates a realistic 3D environment, and simulates S2 activities during pre-deployment and deployment. Learners are provided an option to enter a traditional training path or go directly to the simulation exercise. Accordingly, an inexperienced analyst may choose to complete the training and then the simulation exercise and the experienced S2 may choose to complete the simulation exercise only. Although lessons are addressed independently, scenario events incorporate and build upon previous topics.

4:20 pm — 5:10 pm

Photeo-Powerful Visual Stories that Learners Remember
Patti Shank, Owner, Learning Peaks
Steve Haskin, Principal, Industrial Strength Learning, LLC

Photeo is a mashup of the words photo and video. The "Ken Burns" effect is the popular name for panning and zooming photographs that was popularized in the 1990 production of Ken Burns' PBS series, "The Civil War". This is the basic concept of Photeo, but Photeo goes much farther than panning and zooming still images. Photeo is visual a storytelling technique that builds emotionally powerful narratives that help learners to remember. Photeo stories are a masterful way of getting training messages and information across to learners.